Call for Papers: 2015 MCRSA Conference, St. Louis, Missouri, May 27th-29th

The Mid-Continent Regional Science Association will host its 46th annual conference May 27- 29, 2015 in St. Louis, Missouri. This is to announce the call for regular papers and sessions and to encourage students to participate in the M. Jarvin Emerson Student Paper Competition.

Information can be found at the MCRSA Website:

The MCRSA meeting will offer a stimulating mix of academics and practitioners focusing on applied problems. And, the conference remains a great buy among professional and academic association meetings. Early registrants will enjoy a reduced meeting registration fee of $275. In addition, a special reduced fee for students will once again be in effect. The full student registration fee is $110.

You can either download a conference registration form from the MCRSA Website, or register and pay online at the North American Regional Science Council (NARSC) website Click on the User Area link and sign in or register. Once into the User Area, click on the Register link and select MCRSA 2015 to make your purchases.

The meeting will take place at the Hyatt Regency St. Louis at the Arch hotel in St. Louis. We’re getting a great rate ($149/night). Participants should contact the hotel directly at 1-314-655-1234 and indicate participation in the MCRSA conference, or use the reservations link on the MCRSA Website.

All persons wishing to submit an abstract or session proposal for the MCRSA conference are encouraged to do so electronically via e-mail to John Leatherman at by April 1, 2015.

The meeting also offers students the opportunity to participate in MCRSA’s M. Jarvin Emerson Memorial Student Paper Competition. Strongly encourage your students to enter the paper competition.  It’s a great learning experience and the odds of recognition are favorable for good work.  A cash award of $1,000 is offered and the winning entry is published in the Association’s journal, The Journal of Regional Analysis & Policy. Additional details can be found at the MCRSA Web site.

The MCRSA consists of an interdisciplinary membership from academics and other public and private organizations. The MCRSA is interested in using the tools of regional science to help solve applied problems in rural and urban areas at the local, state and national levels.

Feel free to contact me if you have questions about participating in the MCRSA’s 46th Annual Conference. Please share this information with others who may have interest.

John Leatherman, 785-532-4492,

John Leatherman
Office of Local Government
Department of Agricultural Economics
331G Waters Hall
Manhattan, KS 66506

Call for Applications: Graduate Assistantships in Quantitative Social Sciences, Project Mosaic, UNC Charlotte

Project Mosaic, a Social Science research initiative at UNC Charlotte, is seeking enthusiastic and competent graduate assistants at the doctoral level to work on fostering the mission of Project Mosaic. The successful persons will be data-savvy, have a deep interest in quantitative research methods and statistical modeling with ability to teach specialized workshops on advanced topics. Project Mosaic is a multidisciplinary enterprise headed by Dr. Jean-Claude Thill.

A strong foundation in survey design, sampling theory and expertise in at least one class of statistical models is necessary. In the past, project mosaic has offered workshops to the campus community ranging from econometric analyses (IV methods, panel data models) to advanced statistical modeling (multilevel models, structural equation modeling, spatial statistics, etc.) and data mining methods.

We welcome candidates with specific expertise and interest in spatial statistics and econometrics, as well as spatial social science big data. They may seek admission in one of the following doctoral programs: Public Policy, Infrastructure and Environmental Systems, Geography and Urban Regional Analysis, Organizational Science.

The ideal persons would be keen to learn new methods and train other social scientists and students. Apart from conducting workshops, the graduate assistants will also advise other researchers on methodological issues in their projects and may also be directly involved in specific research projects.

Please submit inquiry material (letter of interest, vita, transcript, and test scores) to Jean-Claude Thill, Project Mosaic Director, at your earliest convenience.

Job Opportunity: Assistant Professor of Geography, Dept. of Geography and Earth Sciences, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

The University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Department of Geography and Earth Sciences seeks a tenure-track, assistant professor in economic geography/regional science for an August 2015 appointment. This position is in support of a multi departmental cluster hiring initiative by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences in the areas of Human and Social Capital, Innovation, & Quality of Life.  At the time of appointment, the successful candidate will hold a doctoral degree in geography, regional science, urban planning, applied economics or related field. Qualified candidates will have primary expertise in applied and empirical industrial/ commercial/retail location analysis, geographies of consumption, or an area related to the economic geography of intra-regional locational analysis. Desirable experience includes one or more of the following: (a) expertise in housing policy, (b) the geography and policy of entrepreneurship and innovation, and (c) social network analysis. Also desired is experience in teaching in a diverse classroom setting. The successful candidate will be expected to develop and maintain a robust and sustainable externally funded research program and contribute doctoral level courses in applied economic geography in the Ph.D. in Geography and Urban Regional Analysis, M.A. in Geography and the interdisciplinary Public Policy Ph.D. programs, as well as appropriate undergraduate courses as needed.  The successful applicant  is expected to be actively engaged in the academic community of the Department of Geography and Earth Sciences and the Public Policy Ph.D. program via participation and leadership through advising and mentoring students, service at the program, College, University, community and professional levels, and programmatic governance.

UNC Charlotte is an AA/EOE and ADVANCE institution. Applications from women, minorities and other underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged.  Applicants should submit a letter of application, responding to the required and desired qualifications listed above, a current vita, at least one writing sample, and graduate level transcripts to where they will find a full position description. Three letters of recommendation should be sent via email to Harrison Campbell, Search Committee Chair at Review of applications will begin immediately and continue until the position is filled.  For more information, contact Harrison Campbell at 704-687-5997, or, or view our department website at

Peter Hall (1932-2014)

The North American Regional Science Council was saddened to hear of the death of Professor Peter Hall. Professor Hall developed the concept of enterprise zones while working with the Thatcher administration in the late 1970s, working closely with the prime minister’s officials to develop such zones in cities throughout England.

Source: Graham Turner, Guardian News & Media, Aug 6, 2014

The New York Times obituary can be accessed here.

Call for Applications: The Benjamin H. Stevens 2015-2016 Graduate Fellowship in Regional Science

Graduate students enrolled in Ph.D. programs in North America are encouraged to apply for the Sixteenth Benjamin H. Stevens Graduate Fellowship in Regional Science, administered by the North American Regional Science Council of the Regional Science Association International (NARSC-RSAI). This Fellowship, in support of thesis research in Regional Science, is awarded annually in memory of Dr. Benjamin H. Stevens, an intellectual leader whose selfless devotion to graduate students as teacher, advisor, mentor, and friend had a profound impact on the field. Regional Science is a multidisciplinary field concerned with the theory and method of urban and regional phenomena. Regional Scientists apply theoretical and empirical frameworks and methods of the social and other sciences, as well as develop new ones specifically for regional analysis and policy.

Eligible students should have completed all degree requirements except for their dissertation by the time the Fellowship commences. A requirement of the Fellowship is that the recipient has no duties other than dissertation research during the Fellowship, although the recipient may hold other fellowships concurrently. Applications from students working in any area or any Ph.D. program are welcome as long as their dissertation research addresses a research question in Regional Science.

The Fellowship consists of a stipend in the amount of $30,000 (U.S.), paid over a twelve-month period. Applications for the 2015-2016 Fellowship should be sent electronically by the applicant to the Selection Committee Chair, Nathaniel Baum-Snow, and received by February 15, 2015. An application consists of the following materials:

1. A curriculum vita of no more than two (2) pages in length.

2. A statement in ten (10) pages or less explaining the questions and issues to be addressed, the approach to be used, and the product expected from the thesis research, preceded by a summary (1-page maximum) describing the intellectual merit of the proposed research, and the broader impacts that may result. The 10-page limit is inclusive of references, but exclusive of tables and figures. This text should be in 12 point or larger font, double-spaced, with one-inch margins; references may be single-spaced.

3. Copies of the candidate’s transcripts for all graduate study. Unofficial copies are acceptable.

In addition, the thesis supervisor shall provide a confidential letter sent separately as an attachment from her/his email account with the student’s name in the subject line to Nathaniel Baum-Snow In the letter the supervisor should assess the quality and significance of the proposed dissertation research, specify the current state of progress toward the candidate’s degree and provide a commitment by the thesis supervisor to obtain a tuition waiver for the candidate for the year of the Fellowship. A condition of the Fellowship is the granting of a tuition waiver for the year of the Fellowship by the university, or equivalent payment of the student’s tuition.

Applications should be emailed to Professor Nathaniel Baum-Snow. Questions may also be sent to him at For information about NARSC, go to For information about RSAI, go to

May 5, 2014

Lawrence Alan Brown (1935-2014)

It is with deep sadness that the North American Regional Science Council learned that Dr. Lawrence Alan Brown passed away peacefully around 10:43am on Sunday, April 6, surrounded by his family and close friends, at Zusman Hospice, 1151 College Avenue, Bexley, Ohio.

Larry was born in 1935 and raised in Erie, Pennsylvania to immigrant parents. His life and work reflects in many ways the classic American immigrant story of success. His father and other relatives fled the pogroms in Ukraine; and the family name was changed from Browarnick to Brown when they immigrated to the U.S. via Ellis Island. His parents instilled in him deep values about the importance of education and achievement.

A self-described “dead-end kid,” Larry initially aspired to be an auto mechanic which may explain his affinity for late-model BMWs. Instead of technical school, Larry went to college after high school because it meant something to his immigrant parents. He received his undergraduate degree in 1958 from the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business, with a B.S. degree in Economics/Business . He first worked as an accountant in New Orleans and then tried law school before discovering his true passion for geography, enrolling in the graduate program at Northwestern University in Chicago in the early 1960s.

The roots of Larry’s interest in geography were set much earlier, however, when he and his brother Ed travelled through Latin America, driving down the Pan American Highway in the late-1950s.  There he encountered an international development worker who shared Preston James’ book – Latin America (1950) with him—an event that Larry often recounted in stories of his early discovery of geography. His formal training began at Northwestern where he earned an MA in geography in 1963 and PhD in 1966. The renowned Swedish geographer, Torsten Hägerstrand, supervised his dissertation fieldwork on innovation and diffusion processes.

Larry’s seminal book, Innovation Diffusion: A New Perspective (1981, Methuen), provided the definitive account of the ongoing adoption and spread of new products and techniques. Earlier research had emphasized the adopters themselves, but Larry refocused attention to the social and geographic processes that supported transformative technologies, products, and behaviors.  Later, his research on mobility and migration offered new insights into why and where people move. His pioneering theory of intra-urban migration (with Eric Moore) in 1970 separated residential mobility process into two stages: dissatisfaction with the current home and the search for a new one. This influential work inspired several generations of demographers and  urban geographers who went on to clarify the mobility behavior of young adults just leaving the family home, the role of residential change in the upward mobility of new immigrants, and the way local housing markets affect homeownership—all compelling and socially significant issues today. More recently, up to and following the publication of another important book, Place, Migration and Development in the Third World (1990, Routledge), Larry’s research sought to show how context shapes the relations among urbanization, economic growth, and population change in Latin America, Third World development, and  in US metropolitan areas.

In addition to these groundbreaking intellectual achievements, Larry’s legacy to OSU and the field of geography lies in his generous, strategic, and unstinting mentorship of graduate students. As a faculty member at OSU, he advised thirty PhD students in all, many of whom are intellectual leaders themselves today. He made a lifetime commitment to those who chose to work with him: following their careers, offering advice when asked, writing hundreds of timely, and pointed letters of recommendation; taking an interest in their personal lives, and being the go-to person in times of need. He had a special relationship with a large cluster of doctoral graduates from Korea, and the story goes that his sociable participation in karaoke sessions won him lasting admiration and gratitude. His hallmark departmental “pointer” was a very simple yet effective item to have people remember their visits, and of course, also came in handy in the classroom.

In a lifetime of professional effort he deservedly earned high honors himself. He was President of the Association of American Geographers, Department Chair (at the same time!), a Guggenheim Fellow, President of the North American Regional Science Council, and a Distinguished University Professor at Ohio State. In recognition of his extraordinary vision and leadership in the field of geography, the AAG presented its Lifetime Achievement Honors Award to Larry in 2008. Larry also worked assiduously to advance the many causes he championed. As department chair, he nominated countless colleagues for teaching, service, and research honors, as well as honorary doctorates. He nominated former students for similar positions at their home universities.

There were also sides to him of which few were aware. Larry had been a consummate golfer in earlier years. He was a very good tennis player and an excellent swimmer. He had an extensive collection of blues and American roots music. He was widely read outside the social sciences.. He felt things deeply and cared for people. And yet, those of you who know Larry will not be surprised that he spent the final days at his place of work: a corner office in Derby Hall with a window facing Bricker Hall where his light often burned late into the night. The hallways and hearts of OSU geography faculty, staff, and students are filled with reminders of Larry’s devotion to the discipline, to his friends, colleagues, and students.  His style and dedication to service has shaped the way we are today, and this lives on in the Lawrence A. Brown Faculty Fellowship.

“Death leaves a heartache no one can heal, love leaves a memory no one can steal.” The first floor of Derby Hall will be different without Larry.  He will be forever missed.

Warren L. Weidenbaum (1927-2014)

The North American Regional Science Council was saddened to hear of the death of economist Murray L. Weidenbaum. While not a regular attendee at NARSC meetings Professor Weidenbaum did deliver the luncheon address at the North American Regional Science meetings in the early 1970s.

Source: New York Times, March 21, 2014.

Full write-up in the New York Times can be found here.

Piet Rietveld (1952-2013)

In memoriam: Piet Rietveld, 1952 – 2013

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Piet Rietveld, Professor in Transport Economics and Head of the Department of Spatial Economics, VU University Amsterdam. Piet passed away, after a short period of illness, on November 1, 2013.

Piet studied econometrics at Erasmus University, Rotterdam (cum laude degree) and received his PhD in economics at VU University Amsterdam. He worked at the International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis (Austria) and was research co-ordinator at Universitas Kristen Satya Wacana in Salatiga, Indonesia. Since 1990 he was professor in Transport Economics at the Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, VU University Amsterdam. He was a fellow of the Tinbergen Institute, the Regional Science Association International (RSAI) and the Netherlands Institute for Transport Policy Analysis (KiM). Furthermore, he was a member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW).

Piet has been Head of the Department of Spatial Economics since 2002. Under his unique and inspiring leadership, the Department has flourished, and has gained and maintained its unique position worldwide in the fields of Spatial, Transport and Environmental Economics. As a researcher, Piet has made ground-breaking contributions to these fields, on a wide variety of themes including transport and regional development, valuation, transport pricing, public transport, transport and environment, land-use modelling, and policy assessment. A good impression of his impressive scientific legacy, the scope of themes he was working on, his academic network, and the wide impact of his research, can be obtained from the overview of his work on Google Scholar (link:

But above all, Piet was dearly beloved by everyone who has had the privilege to work with him, for his wisdom, his warm personality, his gentleness, and his sense of humour. He will be deeply missed.

NARSC featured in International Innovation Magazine

NARSC was the focus of a recent article in the publication International Innovation. Follow link below for the full article.

Denis Maillat (1940-2013)

Sad news: our friend and good colleague Denis Maillat passed away on September 7th, in Neuchatel (CH), after a fight against leukemia. Denis was 73 years old.

After his Ph.D. from the University of Neuchatel and post-graduate studies in England and France, he became in 1969 one of the youngest professor in Neuchâtel. Later Denis was elected as “Rector” of his University from 1991 to 1995. He was also the Director of the Institute for Economic and Regional Research.

Co-founder of the GREMI in 1986 (Groupe de Recherche Européen sur les Milieux Innovateurs), Denis was one of the most respected researcher on industrial districts, territorial dynamics, innovative and learning regions. His books and papers in french and english are basic references in this field.

Past-President of ASRDLF (Associations de Science Régionale de Langue Française), he was also active in ERSA and WRSA. He was the organizer of many regional science workshops and meetings, includins the world RSAI one in Lugano.

Always open for discussion, friendly, Denis took always time to share a drink or a lunch, or join colleagues on field trips. Thank you, Denis, for your smile and your guidance. You will stay in our memories.

Tony Bailly

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